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So we bought a camper and are renovating it this summer. We opened the sides, are replacing the water damage and are going to hit the road in July. But during our peel back, we realized we have brown recluses. Anyone had this issue? We bought this dust to put behind the walls and a spray for the inside. We know bug bombs don't work on recluses. I am sure they probably aren't as scary as I have made it in my head - and other spiders don't really bother me - but these recluses   Sad Sad Sad . Any tips for getting them out of our rig once and for all?
(05-20-2019, 12:19 PM)proffnorrskenet Wrote: [ -> ] We know bug bombs don't work on recluses. 


It depends. Many bug bombs use pyrethrin as their active ingredient, and that is not very effective on any type of spider. But there are bug bombs that use different ingredients that are specially formulated for spiders.
Non-chemical way I have seen them get rid of spideys with is to glue a fabric towel onto a cheap orbital sander and place it so it vibrates the snot out of the wall paneling.

In a day or two, there will be NO spideys...or mice in the RV.
So, a 3000 pound vibrator scares off the arachnids?

No wonder I never had any spiders on my Harleys.

Other stuff happened tho.


Big Grin
I hate to be " that guy" but they really are that scary. And they are farther north than the habitat range maps indicate. I live in MN and I got bit by a brown recluse years ago. Almost lost my arm. It was a crazy life event that led to an insane case of arachnifobia.

So I'm just here cheering you on. You're right to take them seriously. I hope that you can find the solution to this.

~angie

Sent from my VS501 using Tapatalk
^^ I probably shouldn't tell you then that I kept tarantulas as pets (and wrote a book about it) and used to breed Black Widow Spiders for zoos.

Wink


I like the eight-legged eight-eyed little fellows. But alas, some of them tend to not get along with humans very well. To be fair, they won't bite unless they think YOU are trying to east them or trying to squish them .... but they haven some pretty loose interpretations of that.
I love spiders, and most of the time their danger is way overrated... but my brother-in-law lost a toe to a brown recluse, so those, I take seriously.

Don't know if you know the site Do It Yourself Pest Control, but it is my go-to when figuring out any unwanted guest situation.

https://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/bro...spider.htm
or you can read up on them from the Texas A&M university web site. That is the agricultural university that also has a school of veterinary medicine. Lots of information about insect control is available from agricultural schools including the latest thoughts on it.

https://citybugs.tamu.edu/factsheets/bit.../ent-3003/
(05-20-2019, 04:03 PM)lenny flank Wrote: [ -> ]^^ I probably shouldn't tell you then that I kept tarantulas as pets (and wrote a book about it) and used to breed Black Widow Spiders for zoos.

Wink


I like the eight-legged eight-eyed little fellows. But alas, some of them tend to not get along with humans very well. To be fair, they won't bite unless they think YOU are trying to east them or trying to squish them .... but they haven some pretty loose interpretations of that.

I was bitten by a spider while I was lying unmoving for a good half hour in the middle of the carpet in a large living room, watching TV.  Right on the web of the thumb.  Hadn't twitched an inch, and he had to go well out of his way to pick that fight.  Thank goodness it wasn't a dangerous one.  Been bitten while quietly reading in bed, too, same thing, not moving.  Not looking for trouble, to say the least.  I think spiders are like pitbulls.  People who like them, like them no matter what and tend to underplay their potential for aggression.
Anything that eats its own family should be feared.
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