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I just had an unsettling visit from a BLM officer in Colorado and it's made me feel kind of uncomfortable staying on BLM. He asked me a bunch of questions about where I'm from, what I do for work, what I'm doing out here, etc. He took my ID and then he came back and said that they're having issues with people living on public lands. I told him I work online and he said something like that I was on a fine line between breaking the law and not, and that he patrols a large portion of Colorado and he'll be keeping an eye out. He gave me this pamphlet: see post below

He was I suppose nice or cordial but he made it seem like I may or may not being breaking the law and he told me to read the pamphlet and see whether I'm on the right or wrong side of the law. Can someone please re-assure me that I'm not doing anything wrong? I would never stay more than 14 days when I'm not supposed to, and I would never litter or anything like that but this guy gave me the feeling that I'm somehow a criminal. 

Thanks.
I have been saying this for years. it's illegal to live on public land, always say you are camping.

I didn't delete the above post because I feel it's an important issue(not enough posts to post a link). here's a link to the pamphlet the ranger gave Mark,

https://imgur.com/a/x1ZQnXe

highdesertranger
Thanks highdesertranger. It does sound like from the letter that the only way they could get me is to prove I'm looking for employment in the area, erecting fences, permanent structures, staying more than 14 days, leaving things while I'm gone, etc. He made it sound like I had to be out hiking or doing recreational activities as well though, sometimes I just want to stay in and enjoy the views from my van, get online, etc. I really hope they don't start trying to crackdown even more and figure out a way to outlaw what I'm doing altogether. Maybe Colorado isn't as friendly a place to boondock as I thought.
Mark don't let one questionable visit deter you from enjoying OUR(which includes LEOs) public lands.

The ranger wasn't wrong in telling you they are having trouble with people who are turning out to be entitled vagrants. It's happening all over despite claims of the economy being "better". They are spread thin as it is and have millions of acres to babysit. He wsn't wrong in telling you it's a fine line..it is.

As HDR stated, make sure you are CAMPING and only state you are camping whenever asked. I do so to anyone that asks not just rangers. That doesn't mean you can't look for work. Damn, camp some where and fall in love with the area so you decide to move there(as in the actual town not the BLM land). It never happens? lol

As this "lifestyle" becomes increasingly popular they will be cracking down. Keep your campsite clean and make it look like you are camping(using camping gear and not actual furniture, yep seen it, did it) because if you are doing the 2 week thing you really don't have time to look like you put down roots.

Dude was doing his job in making sure you are doing yours. It's unsettling the first time but just go with the flow. They are doing their jobs and if you are in a van as I am, unfortunately we are automatically suspect to some. Thankfully the ones in AZ are more forgiving but that's because they know that the heat will eventually drive almost all of us out.

That pamphlet has nothing "scary" in it. It's typical and I want to clarify regarding leaving your stuff; yes you CAN leave it to save your spot if you go to get supplies, ice, etc. Unless you break down(it's possible, ask me how I know) you probably won't be leaving it unattended longer than 48 hours.
I can attest to the fact that I have stayed in this area the past two summers and I have seen RVs and campers who have seemingly been camped in the same spot for over a month. I'm in the Poncha Springs area. I've also seen piles of trash that people have dumped, so it does seem like a problem area. I'm in an 1988 van so I could see how I might seem like a degenerate, hobo, etc. Does anyone know what the laws are in regards to camping in an area with existing trash? Should I move on next time if I find a nice spot that has trash on it already? I was kind of nervous when the ranger came up because the fire pit here does have trash in it, and there is a bit of litter scattered about, though it's pretty obvious it's been there for a long time. I really hope he didn't think it was my litter or I hope he doesn't see me again and try to charge me for the trash that's already here. The Chaffee County landfill charges like $7/bag of trash and my van is small so I can't afford to be packing out other idiot's trash, which might be hazardous or contain crap that could harm me to touch. 

It's interesting that on the pamphlet it says "must move 30 air miles away from previously occupied location." I thought I read somewhere that you had to move to an entirely different national forest, which is what I have been doing. If I can look on Google Maps and measure the distance from this spot to another spot in the Sans Isabel national forest 30 miles away that would be kind of nice.
I think the fine line might be working (even online) while on BLM. I think there is a rule against charging (making or selling) for anything while on BLM. (I did not read the pamphlet) I think bartering might even be in there. That may make it sound like you are living there if you are doing work. Read to be sure. Of course, you could have been asked to work on something while on vacation. I know I have had to.
Lots of youtubers record video footage on BLM land for later commercial purposes. 

Pecking away at your computer (even for pay) when on BLM land pales in comparison to the people openly making and editing videos about RVs, trailers, motorhomes, camping, drones, fishing, tents, van conversions, build parties, music, heaters, bicycles, ATVs, etc etc etc while on public land.

Even selling a few random items on BLM land is legal IF it's not a 'business'...and even then, a permit can be obtained.

Some rangers (and volunteers) have that 'Barney Fife' mentality and NO common sense. Some even seem to regard the public lands as THEIR property. 

I've seen that attitude first hand.
He’s asking questions to determine if you’re a recreational or non-recreational user of public lands. As stated living on public lands is illegal. As long as you’ve established domincile somewhere you’re not living on public lands. You’re just a camper enjoying the wilderness for a few days.

It’s wise to have the address on your drivers license, vehicle registration and vehicle insurance card all match.

Many people are living the mobile lifestyle today than ever before. Some are living it because they want too, some because they have no where else to go. Sadly one group is making living the mobile lifestyle problematic for all.
Yeah there is a fine line here too on being illegal or not it's called a 4 strand barbed wire fence that separates my property from BLM land.
In Montana it's illegal to cross one BLM land to another BLM piece of land that are just touching by corners.
(05-21-2019, 06:01 PM)B and C Wrote: [ -> ]I think the fine line might be working (even online) while on BLM.  I think there is a rule against charging (making or selling) for anything while on BLM.  (I did not read the pamphlet)  I think bartering might even be in there.  That may make it sound like you are living there if you are doing work.    Read to be sure.  Of course, you could have been asked to work on something while on vacation.  I know I have had to.

He did seem to be nice about my online work, I don't think he had much issue with that. When he was leaving he said "good luck with your business" LOL. 

(05-21-2019, 06:46 PM)LoupGarou Wrote: [ -> ]He’s asking questions to determine if you’re a recreational or non-recreational user of public lands. As stated living on public lands is illegal. As long as you’ve established domincile somewhere you’re not living on public lands. You’re just a camper enjoying the wilderness for a few days.

It’s wise to have the address on your drivers license, vehicle registration and vehicle insurance card all match.

Many people are living the mobile lifestyle today than ever before. Some are living it because they want too, some because they have no where else to go. Sadly one group is making living the mobile lifestyle problematic for all.

I see what you mean as far as fugitives hiding from the law, etc, but that seems kind of screwed up for them to target people simply due to being hard on their luck if they aren't really doing anything wrong. I don't think kicking people when they're down would do any good for anyone. Their chief concern should be whether people are overstaying or disrespecting the land by dumping trash, making noise, etc. I have never had a ranger lecture me like that before, it seems like they should only come up to people after they have noted they stayed over 14 days or are causing trouble of some kind. I've only been in the state for 3 freakin days, seems kind of like overkill to question me like that. I asked him multiple times if it's probably okay for me to stay and he wouldn't give me a straight answer, just told me to read the pamphlet and decide. It should be his job to tell me if I'm allowed to stay or not. I guess I just have to know my rights and stand up for them. Definitely got my anxiety way up though.. I thought I was welcomed here and that they were happy for me to contribute to the local economy.
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