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I was hoping not to put more wood over the insulation, but I think I will at least need a few battens screwed into the cross members of the roof to keep everything up there. Any better advice or links? I am using the pink stuff and have tried the manufacturer's expensive glue, why I went with battens and wood on the walls. I like the performance of the pink stuff with good results on insulation and sound deadening.  

https://www.buildsite.com/pdf/owenscorni...679591.pdf

https://www.googleadservices.com/pagead/aclk?sa=L&ai=DChcSEwjPyqu908LlAhWQ42QKHRfIAAYYABAJGgJwag&ae=1&ohost=www.google.com&cid=CAASEuRoyMJIylqrKVhCTiKwKBpx7A&sig=AOD64_3jvdAqyZFIty9Yi-HbjWowJ4GylA&ctype=5&q=&ved=0ahUKEwi-k6K908LlAhVSpZ4KHXglCnMQ9aACCFU&adurl=https://www.insulation4us.com/owens-corning-foamular-250-3-4-in-x-4-ft-x-8-ft.html%3Fgclid%3DEAIaIQobChMIz8qrvdPC5QIVkONkCh0XyAAGEAQYBCABEgKPM_D_BwE


Owens Corning FOAMULAR 2 XPS insulation, I am using 1 inch in the ceiling.

Manufacturer reccomendation is vague about adhesives: "Secure FOAMULAR® Insulation with construction adhesive compatible with polystyrene or foamed plastics as noted by its manufacturer (follow adhesive manufacturers’ application instructions). • Apply FOAMULAR® Insulation to wall within 15 minutes after adhesive is applied."
~crofter
I found this video and they are using battens to hold it in place after putting it up with adhesive.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QExUgod8rj8

the second video shows some washers that are used to attach foamboard to metal studs, so no need for battens. Fasteners with the attached plastic washers at the hardware store. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZHade9gUdXA

The third video shows application to the ceiling using Crest adhesive and also fasteners, and taping the joints also 
standard with manufacturer's recommendations
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DntM5mpZlEM

Lowes recommends this for use on metal surface: LiquidNails Project
Liquid Nails project, 10 Oz, off white, construction adhesive, interior grade, waterproof, will bond to almost any common building materials including plywood, hardwood, furring strips, paneling, ceramic fixtures, drywall and molding, VOC compliant, rubber based/high solids formula, VOC compliant, replaces TV #284-307 for members in VOC restricted areas.
  • Strong, durable bond

  • Ideal for interior use

  • Low odor

  • Easy water clean-up

  • Non-staining

  • Will not attack foam insulation

  • Up to 30 minutes working time

  • Exceeds ASTM C-557

  • Meets the GREENGUARD Gold Standard
    ~crofter
Did you try the self sticking insulation spikes?
Can you post a pic or link for these? That might be a good option for some.    ~crofter
It was a really warm day today, so I put up 1 inch XPS on the van roof today. THe XPS is durable, moisture proof, and easy to use. After chatting with Lowes, I decided to use Liquid Nails projects glue. 3 tubes for one sheet I put it on pretty thick. If you read the label on Liquid Nails Projects  it is recommended for foamboard, and also not recommended. Well that's silly. I will let you know how it sticks.  ~crofter

Materials I used:

[attachment=24868]


Sticks wedged in pressing the XPS sheets onto the ceiling in my van.
The XPS will be covered with reflectix layer, seems to make a big difference and I like the bright look of it.  Some would choose the 1/8 inch wood panelling for a darker look.   ~crofter
Mmmm... very interesting! Panel with reflectix. I love it. May I steal your bright shiny van interior idea? I'm using Thinsulate SM 600L for insulation. R value is 5.2 ... Very pricey but so easy to install using spray adhesive. When done I'll use what's left over to sew inside curtains.
The 1 inch XPS panel is R5 (on the ceiling) but I put R10 XPS in the walls. ~crofter
So my Liquid Nails Project glue is still drying, according to the info I found online, should be done sometime this afternoon and I can take the bracing out then. The glue seems to be well adhered to the metal side, and the foam should be as well. My last try with this insulation and the manufacturer's glue I had the expectation of the glue being set in a few minutes, probably why it initially fell off the walls (now being held in place by other layers of the wall installation). Online info about cure time:

"Wood glue sets in a little as 15 minutes for basic joining of woods, but requires 24 hours before applying any type of stress to the glued area. Liquid Nails recommends bracing or clamping the adhered surfaces for 24 hours, taking a full week to completely cure to maximum strength" 

~crofter
(11-08-2019, 09:44 PM)travelaround Wrote: [ -> ]Mmmm... very interesting! Panel with reflectix. I love it. May I steal your bright shiny van interior idea? I'm using Thinsulate SM 600L for insulation. R value is 5.2 ... Very pricey but so easy to install using spray adhesive. When done I'll use what's left over to sew inside curtains.
Can you post a pic or link about your process with the thinsulate insulation? And where did you find the 600 Thinsulate, I am not finding that online? I saw some for sale at Joanne's fabric shop and it looked interesting, but no idea came to me about how to use it in a van build.   ~crofter

https://www.joann.com/54in-ivory-warm-window/10674935.html#q=thinsulate%2Binsulation&start=1
"This lining keeps in up to 80% of heat normally lost through windows in winter, and blocks up to 79% of the unwanted solar heat providing a comfortable ambience" 

Thinsulate carried by Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/Fields-Fabrics-Thinsulate-Insulation-Insulator/dp/B07N7MJF4C/ref=asc_df_B07N7MJF4C/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309793609639&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=13918290017893606772&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9032842&hvtargid=pla-655515469097&psc=1&tag=&ref=&adgrpid=61241471426&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvadid=309793609639&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=13918290017893606772&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9032842&hvtargid=pla-655515469097

No R value listed on the Amazon site, but an internet search tells us this (thanks Google):

"What is the R value of Thinsulate?
It retains its insulating properties when wet. The thermal resistance R-value provided by Thinsulate products varies by the specific thickness and construction of the fabric. Values (US units) range from 1.6 for 80-gram fabric to 2.9 for 200-gram fabric."

 If the R values add, then your 600 fabric would have an R value of about R9, that's pretty good. I can use the cheap foamboard because my van is so square, but for a curved outline, this might work better.    ~crofter
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