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Full Version: new carpet install/ which insulation under it?
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here are a few pics of the inside of my van the original carpet was faded dirty and soaked with antifreeze from a leaky heater core. i just pulled the old carpet and want to install some insulation under it while i have it out.so my question is what insulation should i use? also would you recommend filling in the gaps between the ribs?
my original plan was to lay down a 1/2" layer of that pink foam board you find at home depot then cover that and any exposed metal with reflectix then lay my carpet down with a little spray adhesive on top of that. any other ideas or suggestions would be great also if you might know a link to a how to video or a thread that already been over this please let me know.
The pink foam is pretty firm, but in the living area, I think I'd want some 1/4 ply over it and carpet pad .
Up front I think I'd wanna go with a standard underlining similar to original so my heels won't dent foam and don't have to cut in ply pieces.

Maybe someone else has some better ideas.

Check out this thread....
http://www.cheaprvliving.com/forums/Thre...-the-floor

Post # 18 is interesting.



`
Here is what I am doing.

http://www.cheaprvliving.com/forums/Thre...-the-build

I would first tape over the holes. First sand and paint the underside to keep rust from starting. Then tape both sides. Then came the vapor barrier, and then wood. On the wood will be foam padding, and then carpet. You can just ignore the ridges.

Overkill? Perhaps, but I have the time and would rather enjoy a quiet ride and minimal heat loss/gain through the floor.
When I lived in Alaska I found a source of military surplus foam sleeping pads for $5 each. I bought enough to cover my whole floor then put carpet over it.

If you're not familiar with it, back in the 70s when backpacking was becoming a huge craze we all used closed cell foam pads to sleep on. It has a very high R-value--you can easily sit or sleep on snow or a glacier and it won't melt underneath you. But it isn't very comfortable so when the self-inflating pads came out, they took over and everyone used them instead. You can still buy them at Walmart or any sporting goods store for about $10 each. If you can afford it, they work extremely well. Very warm and soft.
Bob
I think they call them yoga mats now Big Grin
after looking around and reading several threads i think I'm going to put down two layers of relectix and then install regular carpet padding on top then some low pile carpet to finish it off.

do you guys see or know of anything else i should be aware of before doing this. is there
anything that needs to be addressed as far as heat from the motor or exhaust?
here is a couple of pics from the insulation that was there the white one was in the rear and the black rubber type one with the fibers was around the motor/front floor board.
Reflectix has a poor R value and I think it is not a good choice for a floor.
Bob
(03-02-2014, 10:08 PM)akrvbob Wrote: [ -> ]When I lived in Alaska I found a source of military surplus foam sleeping pads for $5 each. I bought enough to cover my whole floor then put carpet over it.

If you're not familiar with it, back in the 70s when backpacking was becoming a huge craze we all used closed cell foam pads to sleep on. It has a very high R-value--you can easily sit or sleep on snow or a glacier and it won't melt underneath you. But it isn't very comfortable so when the self-inflating pads came out, they took over and everyone used them instead. You can still buy them at Walmart or any sporting goods store for about $10 each. If you can afford it, they work extremely well. Very warm and soft.
Bob

when you did this did you add any other protection in the high heat areas such as the converter or motor? i would not see it getting hot enough to catch fire but its better to be safe than sorry so i just want to be sure? thanks for the info and i know exactly what your talking about as i used a closed cell foam pad when i first started camping but like you said i have since switched to a big agnes air mattress

(03-02-2014, 06:06 PM)bindi&us Wrote: [ -> ]The pink foam is pretty firm, but in the living area, I think I'd want some 1/4 ply over it and carpet pad .
Up front I think I'd wanna go with a standard underlining similar to original so my heels won't dent foam and don't have to cut in ply pieces.

Maybe someone else has some better ideas.

Check out this thread....
http://www.cheaprvliving.com/forums/Thre...-the-floor

Post # 18 is interesting.
thanks for the link to that post not sure how i missed that one it looks to me as they laid down the reflectix and then a regular carpet pad then some carpet. i am thinking of just doing it this way. also your right i didn't think of the foam getting dented and such that would be a bummer to have a lumpy floor that doesn't bounce back.



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I was in a box van and I only did the box which had no heat areas at all under it. So I can't really say about high-heat areas. But I would use it everywhere else for sure.

About Reflectix: it must have an air space around it to work. If it doesn't have an air space it has an R value of 1.1. This is from their website:

If You Install 2 Layers of a Reflective Insulation, Does the R-value Double?
With multiple layers of product and airspaces between each layer, enhanced performance will be gained. If the product is simply “doubled” (with no air space between the layers), a very minimal benefit is obtained (R-1.1 (per layer) for the Reflective/Double Bubble product).


You won't have any air around it so it will be R 1.1 which is very low for how expensive it is. Doubling it will make it 2.2. Plus, I think it might crush and pop under the weight reducing the R value even further.
Bob
Unless your floorboards are showing any heat discolorations, there should not be any problems. My van has shields where the old single pipe system went. The new cherry bomb duels are just hanging under the frame, 12 inches from the floor boards. Plenty of room to dissipate the heat.
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