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I see this used all over, and have heard several ways it can be used. I figured starting a thread which explores its basic to advanced uses would be of great benefit to everyone here. Hopefully informative enough to become a sticky thread.

Since I'm a bit of a newb and haven't used it at all, only heard, I'd like those who've experience with it to chime in and possibly give us a tutorial (cutting, fastening, best uses).


Thanks
Steven
We have it mostly for winter use to insulate windows. Right now, we're parked nose to the east, so the big back window (west) is covered with shades down and curtains closed to block the sun's heat. Along the south side I've folded them to just cover the half of the window that doesn't open and we get air thru the screens. (There's also a "curtain" of shade cloth that I installed inside the screen door that drops down to break the sun...it rolls up by hand, secured with velcro.)

It also makes a handy quicky solar oven.

The pieces are cut to fit and stay in place on their own in our particular window frames.

I'll leave van insulation uses to those using it, but it does have several useful applications.

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How can this be better than solid, on-the- roll house attic insulation? If so, why aren't home builders using it?
Has anyone out there used on-the-roll house attic insulation in their van? Did you like it?
I know that you need an "air gap" between the insulation. Bob puts a board on top of his roof rack to help shield the sun. This gives the van shade on the roof and, in a way, an attic. Why don't I see more vandwellers doing this? Would this help with cold also, for example long standing snow on a van roof?
I think its because regular house insulation breaks down into a harmful dust you might be breathing in the confines of a van. I've seen people use it on various builds tho..

I have some one sided reflectix in some parts of my van and it is nowhere near as effective as the foil sided styrofoam i used elsewhere. I think its best use is for applications where a stiff insulation isn't feasible
(04-16-2014, 05:02 PM)Belinda2 Wrote: [ -> ]How can this be better than solid, on-the- roll house attic insulation? If so, why aren't home builders using it?
Has anyone out there used on-the-roll house attic insulation in their van? Did you like it?
I know that you need an "air gap" between the insulation. Bob puts a board on top of his roof rack to help shield the sun. This gives the van shade on the roof and, in a way, an attic. Why don't I see more vandwellers doing this? Would this help with cold also, for example long standing snow on a van roof?

Greetings!

Almost every van or other RV that I have worked on over the years, that had a moldy smell had house type insulation in them. Talk about a soggy, stinky, mess... I wouldn't recommend anything other than totally waterproof insulation for any mobile application.

The newer high dollar RV's are using 3/4' - 1" closed cell foam insulation now. Totally impervious to moisture, and much more flexible than the foam board stuff.

Cheers!

The CamperVan_Man
Good information to know. Why do you think the housing world is still using the stuff?
(04-16-2014, 05:02 PM)Belinda2 Wrote: [ -> ]I know that you need an "air gap" between the insulation. Bob puts a board on top of his roof rack to help shield the sun. This gives the van shade on the roof and, in a way, an attic. Why don't I see more vandwellers doing this? Would this help with cold also, for example long standing snow on a van roof?

Snow is considered an excellent insulator. Frank Lloyd Wright used to advocate house roofs that were flat enough to let the snow pile up on it.

Of course, money was no object to the people who could afford to hire FLW to design their houses. Building a roof strong enough to hold all of that weight is expensive. Which is why most builders don't do it that way.

So, no. An air gap between your van roof and snow covered plywood isn't really helping your insulation any.

Regards
John
For starters, Reflectix is a HEAT BARRIER not really insulation and it's why R-Values do not apply. But people do not understand the concept of a heat barrier so it gets called insulation even though it's not. If you want to know more about Reflectix and how to use it, go to their website www.reflectixinc.com as they have lots of instructions on how to use the stuff in different scenarios. At the least, you need 1/8" - 1/4" air space. Use plain packing bubble wrap to hold that air gap, then place Reflectix over that. That way you can be sure that you are not only holding that air gap but the air within that air gap is not moving.

You might want to look up "thermal break" and learn a bit about that important element in "insulation" anything.
(04-17-2014, 04:02 PM)Belinda2 Wrote: [ -> ]Good information to know. Why do you think the housing world is still using the stuff?

Greetings!

It's much easier to keep insulation in a house dry. Roof leaks, seam leaks, and window leaks, are much more common in an RV or camper van.

Cheers!

The CamperVan_Man
(04-17-2014, 05:24 PM)The CamperVan_Man Wrote: [ -> ]Roof leaks, seam leaks, and window leaks, are much more common in an RV or camper van.

Cheers!

The CamperVan_Man

I think that's where the eternabond tape really comes in handy. At least Where roof leaks are concerned. A good caulking usually resolves windows and seams.