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Becoming a tent nomad - Printable Version

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Becoming a tent nomad - Neal - 05-09-2018

I watched Bob's video with the woman who camps with the Springbar tent and have decided to go that route. I've been trying to trade my 2014 Ford Fiesta sedan, but I'm too upside down on it. I had an 88 Dodge B250 but it would have nickeled and dimed me to death. So I will use the tent and my Fiesta as a back up to sleep in. This will be a temporary situation until I get a van or RV. I can't decide what to buy and I can't buy anything until I hit the road for about 6 months.


RE: Becoming a tent nomad - shadowmoss - 05-09-2018

Cheapest and probably easiest way to acquire what you need is to take a weekend or a few days somehow and go live in a state park or other place in the setup with what you have now.  If you don't have the tent yet, sleep in the car.  Take dishes and cookware you now have.  Realize while you are camping what you need.  It may be a short trip the first few times as you find you don't have something you need.  This way you won't have stuff you don't need when you hit the road, and you should have what you do need.  Also, you try it out while not far from home so you can bail until you are set up.


RE: Becoming a tent nomad - Ken in Anaheim - 05-10-2018

I don't know about the Springbars but the best price I've found for Kodiak Flex-bows is : https://www.competitiveedgeproducts.com/Flex-Bow-Canvas-Tents_c_12.html

KinA


RE: Becoming a tent nomad - eDJ_ - 05-11-2018

Where I live,  there used to be a guy who got those early Ford Festiva's and convert them into micro Pickup Trucks.  Similar to this:

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR2px1bSwzmwFwMrDeIe9g...I9f8HhnAcH]

He sold them as fast as he built them to the College kids in the area as they saw them as
very useful and practical for their needs.

I always wondered why a Pop-UP camper of sorts to sleep one or two people couldn't have been built to slide into the back end.  When not in use it could be stored in any of the nearby storage units just off campus and a simple tonneau cover used for any other time it was just used as a transport vehicle. 

Trees fall on cars all the time crushing in the roof's. If you were to find a hatch back where the rear of the roof was damaged it may qualify for building into something like this.

These little 3 cylinder engines got pretty good gas mileage too.

Imagine the pop up similar to what's on this grocery shopping cart made to slide into the Festiva.  It could be used for a beginning traveler or student on week ends.

[Image: camper-kart-kevin-cyr-1.jpg]


RE: Becoming a tent nomad - ratfink56 - 05-11-2018

Crap. Now I'm looking for a Festiva to chop up. Too cool.


RE: Becoming a tent nomad - bullfrog - 05-11-2018

Early 1990's Honda Civic or Suzuki Samurai 4x4, do foam light enough to lift off to set up camp!


RE: Becoming a tent nomad - eDJ_ - 05-11-2018

Imagine the Festiva looking about like this:

[Image: Festiva.jpg]

Because the "bed" of the pickup would be wider than the grocery cart,  the
fold outs wouldn't have to extend so far out to provide 6 1/2' of bed mat. (3 mats...1 across the bed of the pick up and 2 for each fold out)  The center piece may be designed as two panels that are piano hinged together to fold, and braced from the floor.  Similar with the fold out panels which would be hinged from the sides of the popup.  Much like a conventional Popup Tent Camper.  But this could provide for tent living and affordable mobility.  These 1.1 liter engines would sip fuel.  There would be room for the basics but that would be about all.


RE: Becoming a tent nomad - Headache - 05-16-2018

Just some additional info while you ponder your decisions. I have a tent I'm using for storage and while it frees up a lot of room in my van there are some caveats:

1. WIND! I can't escape it it seems. I've already used Gorilla Tape to repair a ripped rain fly.

2. Rain and any other type of dampness sucks if you are using electronics in it. It sucks anyway.

3. It's best you keep your food in the car just in case. There are critters about and tents aren't secure when it comes to hungry animals.

I don't have a high top so the tent has been really convenient just to stand up it. I still sleep in my van.


RE: Becoming a tent nomad - Neal - 05-16-2018

(05-16-2018, 07:19 PM)Headache Wrote:  Just some additional info while you ponder your decisions.  I have a tent I'm using for storage and while it frees up a lot of room in my van there are some caveats:

1.  WIND!  I can't escape it it seems.   I've already used Gorilla Tape to repair a ripped rain fly.

2.  Rain and any other type of dampness sucks if you are using electronics in it.  It sucks anyway.

3.  It's best you keep your food in the car just in case.  There are critters about and tents aren't secure when it comes to hungry animals.

I don't have a high top so the tent has been really convenient just to stand up it.  I still sleep in my van.
I was planning on getting a canvas tent like the one's Kodiak and Springbar sell. My car is small but if I take out the front seat and the top part of the backseat I would have just enough room for almost lying straight. I would primarily want to stay in the tent since I would be able to stand up. The down fall is the tent will weigh close to fifty pounds and my back is thrashed. I'm originally from So Cal so I've camped a lot in areas with rattlers. I have a healthy respect for snakes but I don't worry about them like I would with bears or mountain lions.


RE: Becoming a tent nomad - LathrenJames - 05-20-2018

I considered the Springbar. The tent looks great but it might be a bit high for desert winds and canvas leaks pretty good in rain. Even treated and when wet, canvas gets heavy. I went with a MSR. Not a drop of rain has ever leaked through. I also have a bigger REI and it has done great, too. Springbar certainly looks a lot roomier, though.