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Good morning - Printable Version

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RE: Good morning - maki2 - 06-05-2020

It when you have been designing small spaces for a while to "see" the posibilities.
Build in a fold down shelf/counter that closes up against that upper stack of shelves. That will be the door to keep things secured on those shelves while you are driving. When down it is a significant increase in your counter space. The items inside that cabinet space can be things you would only use when that door is turned into a counter or long term storage items.

A very simple solution that is not expensive to do. Be sure you think about how you will be moving within the space while doing activities. that will determine where your bed goes. If at all possible when designing that fold down section have it also function as a desk/worktable while sitting on the bed.

Perhaps you should start a build thread instead of posting these problems in this thread. You will get a lot more responses related to your build in that section of the forum. There are a lot of experienced builders who read those threads but don't click on this one.


RE: Good morning - desert_sailing - 06-05-2020

(06-05-2020, 04:47 PM)travelaround Wrote:  @Maki - Wonderful Video !!

@desert_sailing - I am amazed your van is already so built out and you're not living in it but . . . well, by contrast, I have only a floor and some insulation, and that's all for the permanent part of the build. I'm using a double-decker cot (I sleep on the top bunk) and have a bedroom dresser in there instead of a counter/cabinets/kitchen. I had help with the floor but I did the insulation and nobody is helping me at this point. My cot is length-wise... 30" wide. I haven't had any trouble sleeping on that, and never fell out of the top bunk. I have a stool to stand on to get into the bed and out of it.
I was really hoping to be able to be full time in the rig at this point. I did do the 7 days in the driveway. I hope to get the final kinks worked out and be living in it fulltime..even if it is in the driveway til things are opened and a bit more travel security is established.

I am packing and selling/giving things away. Cleaning and painting walls.. need that deposit back.

I had hoped to be on the road by July but I have no immediate need to rush and I really want to be prepared. As long as I can get down to Az or such for the fall/winter I will be happy. But I really don't want to miss out on the summer and all the great places to go and see.

I have to say.. the ladies I have spoken to on here and in reading your various posts, you ALL are some tough cookies.. super resilient and resourceful. I am inspired by your get it done attitudes and your knack at making it work.

How I would love to have a cot over this monstrosity of a bed I currently have.


RE: Good morning - maki2 - 06-05-2020

No shame in reworking some aspects of your build. From what I have seen that is very typical.


RE: Good morning - desert_sailing - 06-05-2020

(06-05-2020, 08:06 PM)maki2 Wrote:  reworking some aspects
I would honestly rework the ENTIRE build if able.
If anyone wants to buy what I have inside now..LOL.

I spent a year looking at various builds online. I drew it out and taped it out on the floor.

Theory still requires the practicality test. I wish I had been on the forum during my planning stages to have had pros and cons about certain aspects.

Ultimately I will be happy no matter what I end up with..it will be my home.

There is a lot of beauty in the imperfect.

My humble thanks to all those that have taken time to help clear my path and gave support.


RE: Good morning - maki2 - 06-05-2020

A van build is not that complicated. Women of all ages are doing this and living solo on the road, it does not take being "tough" to do it. Efficient space use and work flow planning is something that many people acquire over the years as a normal part of both work and household life.

If you can't visualize how to make your layout work then make a scale 3D cardboard model including a cutout of yourself.


RE: Good morning - desert_sailing - 06-05-2020

(06-05-2020, 09:13 PM)maki2 Wrote:  A van build is not that complicated. Women of all ages are doing this and living solo on the road, it does not take being "tough" to do it. Efficient space use and work flow planning is something that many  people acquire over the years as a normal part of both work and household life.

If you can't visualize how to make your layout work then make a scale 3D cardboard model including a cutout of yourself.
And yet there are literally millions if not billions of posts online asking questions on how to do it.

I disagree that it doesn't take being tough. There is a mental toughness that Is required to do this successfully. The weak need not apply.  I am certain there are many folks that need the "spirit" just to be able to get out of their van beds at times. Folks dealing with physical limitations have to be tough.. there is not the same degree of comfort one finds in s S&B in a van.
I promise there is more than one person crying themselves to sleep because of the physical and emotional pains they are enduring. Many of them are living this lifestyle not because of choice.

Toughen up buttercup comes to mind. You may not find it to require a certain toughness.. not everyone is superman/woman.

Have you not seen Bobs video where he talks about why he interviews soo many  females on his channel???

He speaks about their toughness and resilience. Their facing certain threats and how they  push through it all.

There is even an entire section here devoted to women. Don't tell me they don't face certain issues unique to them that requires a certain toughness to navigate.

They inspire me...because despite what society tells them is their path.. "sisters are doing it for themselves" >>> 5 minute tune that may clear it up.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drGx7JkFSp4


RE: Good morning - travelaround - 06-05-2020

(06-05-2020, 09:30 PM)desert_sailing Wrote:  I disagree that it doesn't take being tough. There is a mental toughness that Is required to do this successfully.

I'm agreeing with you.

Maki, you have toughness built in. I know you feel comfortable with all aspects of conversion because you were trained - at an airplane factory - am I right? I have so much respect for you and your skills and job history and what you're doing with your trailer ... but I'm not at that level. Not at all.

For me it is a big push to gain one little skill at a time to be able to make any progress at all on my build. You may remember I tried to do my floor myself and got so frustrated with doing everything wrong I finally let a retired pastor at my church install that floor for me - a master carpenter who did such a great and precise job - as I watched - I know that everything about the process is a huge learning curve for me.

I need that toughness! It was a huge thing for me just to cut my thinsulate and glue it to the roof and sides of the van. I feel so incompetent and unskilled for putting up paneling. I don't have any of those skills. It is such a big learning curve for me I feel totally blocked for months at a time. Not being able to go to Medford for the wood and other materials is the least of my problems. The biggest problem I have is my mental attitude at doing something complicated that I've never done before.

I see Bob interviewing women on video and so often their vans are a mess, with no build and some even with a lot of clutter. Then there are a very few who got woodwork training and managed to make their vans beautiful. I have nobody to be here to train me... nobody to show me what to do and exactly "hands on" how to do it and videos don't seem to show me the skills in a specific enough manner, enough to make me feel confident that I know how to do the work.

I can't even watch videos with beautiful builds anymore because I get so upset that I dont' have the skills to fix mine up and nobody to help do it.

So yes, toughness is what I need. Getting through the winter in that van required huge toughness... I was so cold... but also, fixing the inside of it is another kind of toughness and I haven't given up but I really need to develop the courage to try to do these things I'm not used to doing, and honestly, don't even know how to do.


RE: Good morning - maki2 - 06-05-2020

What it really takes is self discipline. Getting up in the morning and getting busy on the list of things that need to get done.

I have never been very good at self discipline, and I am getting worse at it every year Wink

I will happily use fear and anxiety to avoid doing stuff. It is such a socially acceptable excuse and an easy habit to drop into.
I fully realize I do that.


RE: Good morning - maki2 - 06-05-2020

Travelaround. Start with the biggest pieces of insulation first. If you cut them wrong you can then use them later on smaller areas. You are mostly afraid of wasting materials and money rather than afraid of the physical work. So if you do the big ones first you give yourself a safety net when it comes to having enough material to finish the job. Plus of course you can always put in a splice joint if need be.

Trying to do everything perfectly on the first attempt is everyone's biggest hold back. I face it every time I pick up a tool and quite often the frustration of having made a mess of something has me stopped for the day or an hour or two. It is part of why my build goes so slowly.


RE: Good morning - travelaround - 06-06-2020

Thanks Maki. I have the insulation up. What I don't know how to do is ... how to attach the wood to the side of the van.. and the roof, so I can nail or screw paneling to it. That is my next step. I don't have the wood yet - I am planning to get 1x3 furring strips next time I go to Medford, but that could be months from now. It is about 150 miles from here to the nearest Home Depot.