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Tiny fridge condensation - Trebor English - 04-21-2020

I bought a 12 liter ICECO Go12 tiny 12 volt fridge.  Where I am in Florida the dew point has been 70 to 72 degrees the last few days.  The little fridge sweats all the time.  According to my infrared thermometer the skin of the fridge is 65 to 68 degrees with one spot that's 62.  Since it's so wet I'll be returning it.  Maybe I should relocate.  The dew point in Albuquerque is only 20 degrees. 

I'm looking for a recommendation for a tiny low power 12 volt fridge that doesn't get wet from condensation.  After searching I don't see anyone complaining about condensation on the outside.


RE: Tiny fridge condensation - MotorVation - 04-21-2020

My Whynter fridge was sweating pretty badly on the freezer side while I was still in Florida with the high humidity. Once I got out west it stopped completely. I was worried about it at the time. I keep a Whynter factory cover on mine and I'm sure that wasn't helping. It couldn't evaporate. I'm in the high desert now and it's as dry as a bone


RE: Tiny fridge condensation - slow2day - 04-21-2020

Adding insulation would probably solve the problem.

I was in the Midwest during July and Aug. where the humidity is pretty high and didn't have a problem with sweating.

The fridge compartment was covered with 1/2" poly-iso foam board.


RE: Tiny fridge condensation - tx2sturgis - 04-22-2020

You will spend a lot less money by arranging a 12v fan (or maybe 2) so that they can help evaporate the condensation.


RE: Tiny fridge condensation - highdesertranger - 04-22-2020

the reason for the condensation is poor insulation. add more insulation. I have never had a condensation problem with my Engel's, however I am in the west and most of the time in the desert. highdesertranger


RE: Tiny fridge condensation - Trebor English - 04-22-2020

I used four towels to fully wrap the fridge. The skin temperature dropped about 5 degrees and the condensation increased. When the skin temperature is less than the dew point there will be condensation. What is needed is more insulation inside the vapor barrier, the plastic skin, to raise the skin temperature above the dew point. Since raising the skin temperature with fans blowing on the skin will raise electricity use the remaining option is lowering the dew point.

Last night the dew point in Albuquerque was 20 and now it's 33. If it continues to rise at one degree per hour . . .


RE: Tiny fridge condensation - tx2sturgis - 04-22-2020

But you're not in Albuquerque!

I agree, don't add insulation UNLESS you glue it down and can fully bond it to the surface, otherwise those little air gaps will simply fill with water. Then you will have mold.

Yes, the fans will increase electricity use. So add a small 20 watt panel, 2 small 24v dc fans, and run them directly off the panel. Yes it works fine.

(Only during daylight hours tho...I know someone here will call that out if I dont!)  Duh.

I drove truck for decades and one thing that can happen in humid environments, usually near the coasts, is that the primary cab A/C unit in the dash can sometimes freeze up in humid environs....as the driver, you recognize the symptoms when operating near the coasts and turn off the compressor for a while to let it thaw out...then your A/C will work fine for several more hours.

Well, once or twice, every few years, either due to Gulf Coast moisture pushed far inland, or Pacific Coast moisture blown toward and over the Rockies, AND on really humid and hot days in New Mexico (it is rare for BOTH of those conditions in NM) my damn cab A/C would stop working....I'm like...dang...what the heck is wrong with my air conditioning?

After stopping to look things over, and after idling several minutes, you begin to see this large puddle of condensate water dripping under the tractor, on the pavement, and DOH!! the evaporator in the dash has frozen up, which almost NEVER happens when cruising across the very dry New Mexico desert...except of course, when it DOES!

Yep, most of the time, New Mexico humidity levels are around 15%...sometimes lower. But now and then, the desert will surprise us...especially during the monsoon season.

Tongue


RE: Tiny fridge condensation - Firebuild - 04-22-2020

I have an IndelB TB15 (15 quarts), and I am in MA, where it is humid, though not as humid as Florida. I don't insulate it, and it doesn't sweat. Now you all have me wondering why.


RE: Tiny fridge condensation - tx2sturgis - 04-22-2020

The Indel-B probably has better insulation.


RE: Tiny fridge condensation - Trebor English - 04-22-2020

(04-22-2020, 09:51 AM)tx2sturgis Wrote:  But you're not in Albuquerque!

I agree, don't add insulation UNLESS you glue it down and can fully bond it to the surface, otherwise those little air gaps will simply fill with water. Then you will have mold.

Maybe I should go.

The four towels served to insulate causing the lowering of the skin temperature but not doing anything to keep away the water supply.  I made it worse.  Great Stuff spray foam covered with a trash bag would make it better.